Migraine prevention

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Is that a fact?

In a study of people with migraine, almost two in three reported missing family events because of migraine.

Correct! In a study of people with migraine, almost two in three reported missing family events because of migraine.2

Incorrect. In a study of people with migraine, almost two in three reported missing family events because of migraine.2

Make sure to consult your doctor about headache diagnosis and treatment

Quick Poll

How does your spouse or partner support you during a migraine attack?

Results are based on responses from visitors to Excedrin.com

Migraines at Home
& Migraines at Work

Migraine sufferers: Your life isn’t about migraines.

But their toll on your life can be very real.1,2

Some migraine sufferers decline work opportunities rather than face increased stress, a major migraine trigger. To cope with migraines, others avoid outdoor activities, fearing a sudden change in the weather may trigger an attack. Avoid your personal migraine triggers.1

A migraine’s impact on work and family

In a study of people with migraine

  • 1 in 5 reported missing school or work
  • 1 in 2 reported being less productive
  • Almost 2 in 3 reported missing family events2

A few simple lifestyle changes may help migraine sufferers

Making a few changes to your daily habits may help reduce the number of migraine attacks.3

Migraines at home

  • Get up and go to bed at the same time every day
  • Eat healthy foods; don’t skip meals
  • Engage in regular physical activity
  • Limit alcoholic intake
  • Learn new techniques to reduce or cope with stress3

Migraines at work

  • Learn and apply stress management techniques
  • Make your workplace comfortable
  • Keep migraine medications within reach
  • Practice neck stretches at your desk
  • Keep earplugs at your desk to reduce unnecessary noise
  • When possible, complete work from home2
  1. National Headache Foundation. Migraine Prevention Summit Proceedings. Available at: http://www.headaches.org/pdf/Monograph12.pdf. Last accessed July 2011.
  2. National Pain Foundation. Migraine in the Workplace. Available at: http://www.nationalpainfoundation.org/articles/694/migraine-in-the-workplace. Last accessed July 2011.
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Migraine Fact Sheet. How are migraines treated? Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/migraine.cfm Last accessed July 2011.